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Types of Discrimination

All About Gender Discrimination

All About Gender Discrimination

What is Gender Discrimination?

Gender Discrimination is defined as a type of discrimination that involves unlawful, illegal, and unethical prejudice with regard to an individual’s or group’s gender. In certain cases, males can experience Gender Discrimination. However, more often than not, Gender Discrimination involves females. This type of Gender Discrimination has been challenged by activists ranging from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to the Suffragettes.


Gender Discrimination and the 19th Amendment
In 1920, women enjoyed a victory over the presence of Gender Discrimination within American society as they received the right to vote in Federal elections. However, the exploitation of women on both a domestic level, as well as an international level, was still a prominent problem. This form of Gender Discrimination and abuse has been the focus of countless amounts of Women’s Rights Groups.
Types of Gender Discrimination
Although the severity of Gender Discrimination varies in accord with the social spectrum, as well as the public sector, Gender Discrimination is considered by many to be a perpetual issue within the United States:
Sexual Harassment: This type of Gender Discrimination is defined as an unwelcomed sexual advance – through speech, implication, text, suggestion, or simulation – targeted to an individual with regard to their respective gender. Sexual harassment can be inappropriate, in jest, or threatening to its victim. Sexual harassment can result in fear, trauma, or physical or psychological injury.
Gender-based Exploitation: An expressed statement –through words or text – illustrating potential, contingent, or implied action with regard to the actions of another individual resulting from their respective gender.

5 Minute Guide to Racial Discrimination

5 Minute Guide to Racial Discrimination

What is Racial Discrimination?
Racial Discrimination, which is also known as ‘racism’, is the implementation of action resulting from unfounded opinions that are preconceived in nature with regard to the race of another individual or group. Racial Discrimination is considered to be lacking any empirical or pragmatic reasoning or basis. However, the end result is one that can be classified as an illegal, discriminatory, and unlawful act.
Types of Racial Discrimination
Racial Discrimination can take place in a variety of forms and is rarely specific to a single race. While minorities can be susceptible to Racial Discrimination, circumstances exist in which even Racial Discrimination can exist in a reverse fashion:
Reverse Racism: Reverse Racism is a brand of Racial Discrimination that exists in the event that discrimination and bias exists involving a race comprising the majority of a population in lieu of a minority
Employment Racial Discrimination: Racial Discrimination that takes place with regard to hiring practices for employment that involve the unfair and biased treatment, analysis, and review of applications submitted by minorities. This is considered to be employment-based Racial Discrimination.
In order to combat this nature of Racial Discrimination, programs have been imposed on a Federal level that aim to ensure the equal opportunity afforded to all races within the scope of employment. Such programs include the Equal Opportunity Program, as well as the Affirmative Action Program.
Hate Crimes: Hate Crimes are categorized as criminal acts that target victims based on their respective race in tandem with prejudice upheld by the perpetrator(s).

Direct Discrimination vs. Indirect Discrimination

Direct Discrimination vs. Indirect Discrimination

The concept of discrimination
as an offense and a meaningful ground for legal action and remedy is understood
in the legal system of the United Kingdom as being split into two specific
subjects: direct discrimination and indirect discrimination. Either of these
categories for discrimination can refer to a diverse array of factors comprising
of an individual’s identity, as defined by either that person or others, and
can thus be used to mount a legal action and bring compensation to the
plaintiff.

Direct discrimination refers to an action which explicitly
specifies the trait for which a person is being excluded or discriminated
against in some way, while indirect discrimination can be determined to have
occurred when some other trait which is named as being discriminated against
can be reliably linked to a group vulnerable to discrimination. In enacting the
latter principle of indirect discrimination, British legal theorists are
believed to have drawn on the precedent of the 1964 American Civil Rights Act,
as well as on decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court.
 

In terms of the prevention of
both direct discrimination and indirect discrimination, one of the most
pertinent pieces of legislation is the Sex Discrimination Act of 1975.
According to this legislation’s language on indirect discrimination, the
requirement of a trait which is generally not found in women would thus
constitute indirect discrimination against women. Indirect discrimination is
generally held to be more applicable on a society-wide basis, while direct
discrimination tends to arise instead from individually brought cases.