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Types of Discrimination

5 Minute Guide to Racial Discrimination

5 Minute Guide to Racial Discrimination

What is Racial Discrimination?
Racial Discrimination, which is also known as ‘racism’, is the implementation of action resulting from unfounded opinions that are preconceived in nature with regard to the race of another individual or group. Racial Discrimination is considered to be lacking any empirical or pragmatic reasoning or basis. However, the end result is one that can be classified as an illegal, discriminatory, and unlawful act.
Types of Racial Discrimination
Racial Discrimination can take place in a variety of forms and is rarely specific to a single race. While minorities can be susceptible to Racial Discrimination, circumstances exist in which even Racial Discrimination can exist in a reverse fashion:
Reverse Racism: Reverse Racism is a brand of Racial Discrimination that exists in the event that discrimination and bias exists involving a race comprising the majority of a population in lieu of a minority
Employment Racial Discrimination: Racial Discrimination that takes place with regard to hiring practices for employment that involve the unfair and biased treatment, analysis, and review of applications submitted by minorities. This is considered to be employment-based Racial Discrimination.
In order to combat this nature of Racial Discrimination, programs have been imposed on a Federal level that aim to ensure the equal opportunity afforded to all races within the scope of employment. Such programs include the Equal Opportunity Program, as well as the Affirmative Action Program.
Hate Crimes: Hate Crimes are categorized as criminal acts that target victims based on their respective race in tandem with prejudice upheld by the perpetrator(s).

Sexual Discrimination Overview

Sexual Discrimination Overview

What is Sexual Discrimination?
Sexual Discrimination is an overarching term that qualifies a type of illegal, unlawful, and unethical discrimination that is fostered by a prejudicial belief containing inherent and unproven bias with regard to either an individual’s or group’s gender or sexual orientation.
Gender is defined as the identification of an individual as a male or a female. Gender discrimination is a form of sexual discrimination resulting from presumed opinions that are neither proven nor rooted in empirical, factual basis.
Sexual Orientation is defined as the nature, particularity, and tendency of the sexual attraction latent in an individual or group. Although an ongoing debate exists with regard to the hereditary qualities of the development of sexual orientation, the persecution and discrimination of individuals resulting from their respective sexual orientation continues to exist.

Types of Sexual Discrimination
A wide variety of Sexual Discrimination can take place within the vast expanse of social settings in tandem with the broadness of the public sector. The following are some examples of Sexual Discrimination:
Hate Crimes: These types of crimes are typically committed as a response to personal bias and prejudice with regard to any or all definable traits or qualities latent within an individual or entity. Hate Crimes taking place as a result of Sexual Discrimination can range from the destruction of personal property to the physical assault of an individual or group.
The Glass Closet: A term that is commonly attributed to Sexual Discrimination that exists in a place of employment in which an individual is denied employment advancement or opportunities as a result of sexual orientation.

Direct Discrimination vs. Indirect Discrimination

Direct Discrimination vs. Indirect Discrimination

The concept of discrimination
as an offense and a meaningful ground for legal action and remedy is understood
in the legal system of the United Kingdom as being split into two specific
subjects: direct discrimination and indirect discrimination. Either of these
categories for discrimination can refer to a diverse array of factors comprising
of an individual’s identity, as defined by either that person or others, and
can thus be used to mount a legal action and bring compensation to the
plaintiff.

Direct discrimination refers to an action which explicitly
specifies the trait for which a person is being excluded or discriminated
against in some way, while indirect discrimination can be determined to have
occurred when some other trait which is named as being discriminated against
can be reliably linked to a group vulnerable to discrimination. In enacting the
latter principle of indirect discrimination, British legal theorists are
believed to have drawn on the precedent of the 1964 American Civil Rights Act,
as well as on decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court.
 

In terms of the prevention of
both direct discrimination and indirect discrimination, one of the most
pertinent pieces of legislation is the Sex Discrimination Act of 1975.
According to this legislation’s language on indirect discrimination, the
requirement of a trait which is generally not found in women would thus
constitute indirect discrimination against women. Indirect discrimination is
generally held to be more applicable on a society-wide basis, while direct
discrimination tends to arise instead from individually brought cases.

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